Jeff Bezos goes into space. Day 3: Re-entry

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This followed in similar dreamy exclamations of another space billionaire, Richard Branson, who also portrayed his own a self-financing suborbital trip as something beyond human language. “I’ll never be able to justify it,” he said its press conference. “It’s indescribably beautiful.” The word he continued to use was “inspiration” – in his opinion, the universe was not an endless void, but a mountain peak that changed lives and symbolized what humans could achieve.

Even Virginia’s chief operations engineer, Colin Bennet, who was on a flight, jumped on a train of awe, depicting the universe as a kind of sky. “It’s very zen,” he said. “It’s very peaceful there too. What popped out to me were the colors and how far it looked. … I was fascinated. “

Space travel seems to be all about inspiration, beauty and returning … to our natural state?

Of course, we have already heard a lot about the intangible magic of looking at the Earth from NASA astronauts who have experienced spiritual moments during their work. But as people increasingly visit the universe not to work, but to indulge in a life-changing experience, the discovery shifts from an unobtrusive side effect to the thing. The premise of space tourism is not exactly guaranteed by tents, but it is certainly taken for granted. (That and a lot of fun hover around. The video from the RSS First Step, New Shepard capsules, showed the crew spinning and playing, throwing a ball and throwing skittles without gravity.)

But even as Jeff Bezos giggled about the astonishing flirtation with the universe, the fact is that in the end, all that mumbo jumbo is secondary to him. The thrills and discoveries of space travel are just the main reason why he started Blue Origin: to begin a journey on which millions of people would leave Earth to live and breed in space colonies, expanding our species to over a billion souls.

He was explicit about when I spoke to him in 2018: “I love the adventure of the universe; that’s great, “he said. “But that pales in comparison to the importance of ensuring that our grandchildren’s grandchildren do not face a dead life. Basically, we have a choice that we will make as a civilization, and that is will we expand into the solar system or will we accept a stalemate here on Earth? Over the years, there have been many reasons people have cited why we need to go into space, and this is the only one I personally find super motivating. “

He repeated the message at his post-flight press conference yesterday, although he tactically avoided an explicit conversation about space colonies. “What we’re doing isn’t just an adventure,” he said. “It is also important. Because what we are doing is something big. … We will build a path into space so that our children – and their children – can build the future. “

He continued to insist that his goal was not to escape from Earth, but savings that is, because it is “the only good planet in the solar system.” But as I understood it from the hours of conversation in 2018, he sees the Earth as a reserve, a refuge, which can be preserved when destructive production moves into the unimaginable space of the universe so that natural ecology can thrive. The people who still live here will be the guardians of the Earth. A huge population of people living in lush galactic colonies – don’t think of cramped conditions International Space Station, but massive green structures with lakes, shopping malls and stadiums – can return to their home planet for visits or stays.

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